Is Waiting Worth the Risk?

May 08

Is Waiting Worth the Risk?

When it comes to municipalities, they try to do what’s in the best interest of its residents while also making sure it’s in the best interest of the city and lessening risk. It can range from tax breaks and school rezoning to real estate development and infrastructure repairs. Planning ahead on for these items as best as possible can save a lot of time and money, which is the case in Kansas City with its aging water mains. City officials have devised a plan to be proactive instead of reactive when it comes to handling the aging water main systems throughout the city. In 2012, the city suffered more than 1,800 water main breaks with an average of five per day. A good number of these have to do with the Kansas City clay soil. Clay soil swells and shrinks during extreme weather and record-breaking heat that year in Kansas City is believed to have been a contributing factor to the record number of breaks. The city had to do something to lower the number of breaks. Because of this significantly high number of breaks, a local water service company rolled out a water main replacement program. Within five years of rolling out the replacement program, there had been a huge reduction in breaks. The company developed a forecasting method that included their entire 2,800 miles of in-ground pipe, essentially a model that helps them define where all the pipes are, which ones were at the greatest risk, and where they can save the most dollars by replacing the riskiest sections before anything happens. They have made a commitment to replace one percent of the lines annually. As a result of their efforts, the number of annual breaks has gone from over 1,800 down to 745 last year. According to the city’s statistics, more than $108 million has been spent to date on the water main replacement program. The numbers also show a savings of more than $22 million in potential repairs as the work has enhanced the integrity of the system and the instances of water main breaks have gone down. If you are looking for information on protecting, lining and repairing pipes, or for the nearest installer,...

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Kansas City’s Clean Water Initiative

Oct 15

Kansas City’s Clean Water Initiative

This week, KC Water participated in the national advocacy and educational event, Imagine a Day Without Water. Across the country, organizations, elected officials, corporations, and environmental advocates worked together to educate people about how water is essential, the challenges facing water and wastewater systems, and the need for investment. Many people take water service for granted. Clean, safe, reliable, and affordable water comes out of the tap and flows down the drain without a second thought. But, the massive infrastructure, much of it underground, which brings water to homes and businesses, takes it away, and treats it, is aging. Kansas City’s Water Treatment Plant is able to produce up to 240 million gallons of water each day. To ensure that every drop is delivered to your tap safe and healthy, an average of 60 samples per day are tested, taken from throughout Kansas City, for over 300 contaminants. There are, operated and maintained, almost 2,800 miles of mains in Kansas City. Lined up end-to-end, these pipes would stretch from New York, NY to Los Angeles.  Kansas City’s original water and sewer infrastructure was laid in 1874, and some of this pipe is still in use today.  The strategy is to continue reinvesting in Kansas City’s infrastructure by strategically replacing critical systems each year. Each time a pipe is installed it is estimated to last 100 years, or more. Kansas City residents, next month the city will begin a sewer main replacement and realignment that will likely conclude in the summer of next year. Existing water mains have experienced numerous breaks, resulting in service interruptions. The replacement will include State Line Rd to Holmes Rd & 86th Terr. to 132nd Terr.  Normal travel routes may be disrupted during this time.  Your patience is...

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State Road Water Main Replacement Projects

Sep 30

State Road Water Main Replacement Projects

In its continuing efforts to coordinate infrastructure improvement projects, KC Water is completing water main replacement projects in the Waldo Tower Homes Association area. The projects focus on the water supply and distribution system to decrease the number of water main breaks, improve the reliability of the system, and decrease service disruptions. Residents of Waldo Tower Homes, here’s a summary of work being done for you: the construction on the water main replacement project will begin soon at 15 locations between Stateline Road to Holmes Road; 75th Street and 85th Street. Approximately 15,500 feet of water mains will be replaced.  Construction is expected to begin in October and be completed in July 2016, weather permitting.  Another project that will be underway shortly, is a water main replacement project to make repairs at 17 locations between Stateline Road to Harrison Street; 44th Street and 75th Street. More than 13,000 feet of water mains will be replaced. Construction is expected to begin in November 2015 and be completed in June 2016.  Rehabilitation of Sanitary Sewers will also be taking place as part of the improvement strategy and includes the Waldo Tower Homes, as well.   During construction, customers may experience minor wastewater service disruptions and temporary street closures.   Kansas City, Perma-liner Industries has some good news!!  We are introducing a zero down, no payments for 90 days on our state of the art 22 foot Perma-Main Turn Key Trailer.  We also include training for this trailer system.  This is our Top Gun system that can rehabilitate 6”-10” diameter pipelines.  There are many other points to consider when using this this powerhouse for installation purposes.  A project that is consists of three installations each approximately 500 ft.  can be completed in 3 days versus the 9 day time frame for a conventional dig.  To find out more about this package deal, call us or go online to...

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