Cured-In-Place-Pipelining Demonstration Days July 18 – 19

Jul 18

Cured-In-Place-Pipelining Demonstration Days July 18 – 19

Perma-Liner Industries, LLC. to Hold Live Cured-In-Place-Pipelining Demonstration Days and Educational Sessions Open House will be held in Anaheim, Cali. on July 18 – 19 ANAHEIM, Cali. – With state-of-the-art technology options, it is not necessary to dig up aging or failing pipes to repair them. There is an efficient and cost-effective way to repair these pipes called the Cured-In-Place-Pipe (CIPP) method. Perma-Liner™ Industries, LLC. (“Perma-Liner”), the leading manufacturer and supplier of trenchless pipeline rehabilitation equipment and materials in North America, is holding an Open House from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on July 18 – 19 at its Anaheim, Cali. facility located at 1910 E. Wright Cir. Throughout the multi-day event, company professionals will provide information about Perma-Liner and the technology the company is known for nationwide, which include the Patented Perma-Lateral Lining System, Sectional Point Repair, Perma-Main™ Continuous Lining Top Gun™ and InnerSeal™ Lateral Connection Solution. Attendees will have the opportunity to view and interact with Perma-Liner materials and equipment while also observing live demonstrations in the Anaheim facility. Additionally, the company’s turn-key trailer systems will be onsite so attendees can learn how the materials are Q/A tested and installed using Perma-Liner Installation Methods. The same certified installation methods are used by municipal agencies, drain cleaners, plumbers, and municipal contractors worldwide. During the two-day event, Perma-Liner will unveil a new technology that will join its already robust catalog of equipment and materials. This will be the first time the public will get a look at the company’s newest technology. Anyone interested in learning more about the technology, looking for a certified Perma-Liner installer, or becoming a certified installer is invited to attend. To attend, complete the registration form ### About Perma-Liner™ Industries, LLC. Perma-Liner (PLI) is the leading manufacturer and supplier of trenchless pipeline rehabilitation equipment and materials in North America. Since 1999, PLI has developed systems to rehabilitate existing sewer systems without excavation. To learn more about Perma-Liner, visit...

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Epoxy vinyl ester resin brings many advantages to CIPP industry

Jul 09

Epoxy vinyl ester resin brings many advantages to CIPP industry

Perma-Liner™ Industries, LLC. (“Perma-Liner”), the leading manufacturer and supplier of trenchless pipeline rehabilitation equipment and materials in North America, is introducing a new high-performance epoxy vinyl ester resin called Perma-Liner™ Vinyl Ester. The resin is Bisphenol-A Epoxy-based dissolved in styrene and is available now for purchase. “We are excited to introduce our newest resin into our already broad spectrum of products,” said Jerry D’Hulster, president of Perma-Liner Industries, LLC. “The high-performance epoxy vinyl ester resin offers an excellent balance of corrosion and performance properties. It will allow Perma-Liner to expand to new markets with its unique capabilities.” The new resin provides the corrosion resistance, durability and toughness that is required within the CIPP industry. When it comes to certain specific applications where fluid temperature is relatively higher, the resin has an advantage over epoxy. The demanding needs of many applications including high pressure and/or corrosive environments are also met with the Perma-Liner™ Vinyl Ester. Perma-Liner’s newest product’s molecular architecture delivers a number of benefits, including superior mechanical properties, excellent catalyzed pot life, and meets the requirements of California Greenbook Pickle Jar Test. There is another key benefit of the new resin: less expensive than the Epoxy...

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America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

Jun 06

America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

There are many variables threatening America’s water from pollution issues and aging infrastructure to raising costs and droughts and rainfall patterns as the climate changes. The U.S. used to be a leader when it came to water infrastructure and management. Now, the U.S. is lagging behind receiving D ratings for dams, drinking water and wastewater. It’s time to start focuses on possible solutions to curb these issues – the U.S. can get A ratings and below are some of the solutions that may get the nation where it needs to be. It starts with creating a national-level governance. Water technically has no boundaries and is very good at sometimes ignoring the municipal boundaries it does have. So what does this mean? One town’s water use or sewage can affect other cities or states that rely on the same water supply. That’s why many countries have a national water authority or commission that oversees water management across the country. The U.S. does not and we’re exactly the opposite. Our nation’s water supply is managed by individual municipalities each doing their own thing. This creates numerous hurdles to climb and makes it difficult to initiate and complete regional projects. To do almost anything, there needs to be a budget and that’s the case with water infrastructure. The government spends only two percent of its GDP on infrastructure, and water infrastructure makes up just a part of that. The U.S. is spending less than Vietnam, Mexico, and Chile. If the U.S. wants nice things, like a water infrastructure that does not fail us, then the U.S. has to be willing to pay for them. One possible solution that most do not consider is the private investor sector. Many investors are interested in investing in water-related issues, but they want to know more about the social and environmental effects their investments will have. The problem is that there are a lot of inconsistencies in how companies report these estimates. It has been suggested that investors, academics and regulators need to team up to create a standardized system of evaluating the impacts of sustainable investments. Another challenge is getting investors to understand how complex and important water is, since it affects agriculture and many...

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Is Waiting Worth the Risk?

May 08

Is Waiting Worth the Risk?

When it comes to municipalities, they try to do what’s in the best interest of its residents while also making sure it’s in the best interest of the city and lessening risk. It can range from tax breaks and school rezoning to real estate development and infrastructure repairs. Planning ahead on for these items as best as possible can save a lot of time and money, which is the case in Kansas City with its aging water mains. City officials have devised a plan to be proactive instead of reactive when it comes to handling the aging water main systems throughout the city. In 2012, the city suffered more than 1,800 water main breaks with an average of five per day. A good number of these have to do with the Kansas City clay soil. Clay soil swells and shrinks during extreme weather and record-breaking heat that year in Kansas City is believed to have been a contributing factor to the record number of breaks. The city had to do something to lower the number of breaks. Because of this significantly high number of breaks, a local water service company rolled out a water main replacement program. Within five years of rolling out the replacement program, there had been a huge reduction in breaks. The company developed a forecasting method that included their entire 2,800 miles of in-ground pipe, essentially a model that helps them define where all the pipes are, which ones were at the greatest risk, and where they can save the most dollars by replacing the riskiest sections before anything happens. They have made a commitment to replace one percent of the lines annually. As a result of their efforts, the number of annual breaks has gone from over 1,800 down to 745 last year. According to the city’s statistics, more than $108 million has been spent to date on the water main replacement program. The numbers also show a savings of more than $22 million in potential repairs as the work has enhanced the integrity of the system and the instances of water main breaks have gone down. If you are looking for information on protecting, lining and repairing pipes, or for the nearest installer,...

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Kansas City takes the City by Storm (And Storm Drain)

Jun 26

Kansas City takes the City by Storm (And Storm Drain)

Kansas City has been busy revamping the sewer mains and pipelines in order to thwart the problematic sewer overflows. Before this, a comprehensive water main replacement program was launched which included a detailed plan. Mainly, to keep the 2,800-mile water main matrix working up to better standards. In years’ past, the city had experienced over 1800 water main breaks. Currently, the program is anticipating the replacement of the sewer pipelines in a process time of up to 30 miles a year. Due to drought concerns, the city is also keeping water-saving tactics at the forefront of this initiative. In conjunction with addressing water main stability, the additional sewer rehabilitation project is well underway. Did you know that the city uses dye, or essentially food coloring, to test the efficiency of the sewer system? This is done on a daily basis to prevent sewer overflows and basement backups. Interestingly, red dye is used to confirm the location of a service line to a property. Green is used for cave-ins and sinkholes and also in storm drains, which may lead to a common sighting of green dye in the local stream or creek. Sewer advisory just in…the city has alerted residents in the area near 200 W. 94th Street of a sewer overflow.  At the time of the incident, the overflow was ongoing and spilling less than one-half gallon per minute. The manhole and sewer are located on the bank of Dyke Branch Creek.  Wastewater has entered the creek but has been contained by repair and bypass pumping. Kansas City, Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our exciting summer event! If you missed our Open House this month in California, no worries! Come to our Delaware Open House next month! Stay tuned for all of the details. It’s taking place from July18th-20th. We want to see you there, and as always, we’ll have our experienced crew demonstrating equipment and all the latest in CIPP. Make a plan to attend and see you...

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Kansas City Overflows Must Go- Taking Action to Improve the Sewer System

May 03

Kansas City Overflows Must Go- Taking Action to Improve the Sewer System

Kansas City is in the midst of recovering from floods due to severe rain events, as well as rehabilitating the water infrastructures that have given way to leaks and fractures in the sewer pipelines. For the last several years, there have been ongoing repairs and replacement programs for the purpose of bringing an unstable system back up to date. In addition to this, the city is also proceeding with a massive overhaul to the water mains that have fallen into a state of disrepair. Neighborhoods, more specifically, residences near North Brighton Ave and North Highland Ave are one of many areas that have concluded the replacement of their water mains. Some dating back to the late 1800’s, with the majority of pipelines dating back over sixty years ago, will be included in a multibillion-dollar sewer overhaul program. Homes built in the 1950’s in low-lying areas, now experience flooding from both rushing rain water and infiltration of that water from the storm pipes to the sanitary sewer lines. Some residents have experienced sewer backups in basements and have installed grinder pumps as a means to stop water from entering their homes. Older homes have rain gutters or other storm drains connected directly to the sewer line. Additionally, Instead of allowing the excess water to back up into streets and basements, an old-age tactic was to build overflow valves that divert some of the untreated flow into the nearest waterway. While these practices have become obsolete and are no longer accepted, rehabilitating the century-old sewer lines is a vital measure in assuaging sewer overflows. A combination of the rehabilitation projects and modifications to pumps and operating procedures have resulted in a significant reduction in sewer overflows due to inflow and infiltration. Contact Perma-Liner Industries for any of your local cured-in-place-pipelining system needs!...

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Kansas City Assists Homeowner’s with Sewer Repair Costs

Feb 28

Kansas City Assists Homeowner’s with Sewer Repair Costs

Kansas City has implemented a new, and much needed, program to improve the quality of unstable sewer systems throughout residential areas. For a limited time, residents facing street repair for sewer work are able to receive as much as $5,000 for charges associated with the repair. Ongoing improvements are taking place due to a number of households with improper plumbing connections and drainage problems. If a resident chooses to participate in the optional program, the primary focus will be on disconnecting gutter downspouts, sump pumps and other drainage mechanisms on private property; that are improperly connected to sewers.  Because of these faulty connections, heavy rains have overwhelmed the city’s sewer system and contributed to several incidences of sewer backups in homes and businesses. The reimbursement program is designated only for single-family homeowners facing repair on a paved public street, incurring a fee. Sewer and water line repair have been on the radar of many cities within past few years. Many cities have promoted insurance programs that cover broken lines for a monthly fee.  While leaks in the sewer pipelines, faulty meters, and unmetered water remain part of the problem, the city has also lost significant water by way of abandoned houses and rental properties, where water meters have been removed. The city has recently replaced approximately 100 miles of water mains. Interestingly, the oldest pipelines, valves, and meters are located south of the Missouri River. As the city expanded south of the river, it inherited older water systems.  Kansas City has nearly 2,800 miles of pipes, 35,000 valves, 23,000 fire hydrants and 18 pumping stations which are dispersed across more than 300 square miles. Interesting fact: nationwide the average water treatment facility pumps 25,000 to 30,000 gallons of nonrevenue water per connection per year. That averages approximately $30 to $40 per...

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