Kansas City’s Bright Idea for Manhole Covers

Jun 21

Kansas City’s Bright Idea for Manhole Covers

Kansas City has come up with a very creative and clever project for manhole covers. These newly designed covers are capturing the attention of many as they walk through the city. The project consists of 100 intricately designed covers, scattered strategically throughout the city. From inception, the idea was to foster a sense of environmental consciousness and accountability. The new design is meant to remind the community to refrain from putting trash down the storm drains as many of them lead to rivers, streams and creeks. This month, Kansas City Water Services installed the final two new storm drain covers in a neighborhood at 74th and Lydia. The new design is a result of a contest held two years ago. More than 50 people, of varying ages, submitted entries and two winners worked together on the final design. The new manhole covers are as cost effective as the older ones with minimal expense as there are 50,000 storm drains in the city. The new manhole covers have been put in high traffic areas such as the Power and Light District, and Kauffman Stadium. This will incite a likelihood of visibility, as well as awareness. Water Services are saving the old storm drain covers and will use them as replacements when one gets damaged or destroyed. Interesting fact: Did you know the 909 Walnut building is on the National Registry of Historic Buildings and is a treasured sight on Kansas City’s skyline? Originally built in 1931, the renovation of the 35-story building has turned this historic and unique piece of architecture into a modernized luxury with residences and office space creating a vibrant downtown area. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay...

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Protecting Sewer Systems with Alternatives

Mar 07

Protecting Sewer Systems with Alternatives

Kansas City is known for having an abundance of beautiful fountains, enough to match the allure of well-known cities in Europe. But with an aging combined sanitary sewer and storm water sewer systems throughout much of the urban core, there are many problems caused by increased storm water runoff during heavy rainstorms. The city has faced the growing need to address and reduce the burden caused by increased storm water runoff. With the need to explore other solutions, the city is setting an agenda to use alternative resolutions to off-set storm water runoff.  In combination with the traditional functioning of concrete pipes and tanks, the goal is to meet the overall required capacity needed for acceptable storm water management systems. Kansas City’s Overflow Control Plan will be actualized over a period of 25 years and cost an estimated $2.4 billion. It has been designed to meet regulatory requirements established by the Environmental Protection Agency and Missouri’s Department of Natural Resources to reduce and prevent sewer overflows. When this project is complete, there will be a reduction of approximately 88% of the current number of overflows throughout the entire city. The effective use of green solutions can reduce the size and cost of more customary solutions, which includes concrete pipes used to move storm water offsite and towards the wastewater treatment plant. Another noteworthy strategy will be the introduction of curb extensions, which have been added on several side streets within the city.  The purpose is to reduce the quantity of water flowing into the intersections, and similarly, reduce the amount of runoff going into the storm sewer...

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Kansas City’s Approach to Improved Sewer System

Jan 12

Kansas City’s Approach to Improved Sewer System

Kansas City sits at the junction of the Kansas and Missouri rivers and is part of a metropolitan area that extends into the state of Kansas. Like those of many older cities in the United States, Kansas City’s sewer systems are aging. Each year, combined sewer overflows discharge 6.5 billion gallons of untreated effluent, and sanitary sewer overflows discharge another 100 million gallons. During large storms, these systems can become overwhelmed by excess water, causing flow volume and bacteria levels to impact surrounding water quality.  This causes the sewer systems to reach their conveyance capacity. The result is the likelihood of sewer backup and localized flood events.  Recently, as part of a Clean Water Act settlement, Kansas City entered into a consent decree with the U.S. EPA to eliminate all discharges from its sanitary sewer system and reduce discharges from combined sewer overflows by 5.4 billion gallons per year by 2025, at an estimated cost of $2.5 billion. Kansas City identified funding as the primary obstacle to improved storm water management and water quality, and reported a need to implement innovative approaches and solutions that combine local, state, and federal funding. Both a storm water fee and a dedicated sales tax exist to fund the city’s storm water services. Kansas City, SAVE THE DATE!! Perma-Liner Industries cordially invites you to the annual WWETT show! The Water & Wastewater Equipment, Treatment & Transport Show is happening on February 17th– 20th at the Indiana Convention Center.  You can expect to be well informed with hundreds of exhibits, educational sessions, entertainment, networking, and live demonstrations. Meet you there! Convention Center 100 South Capitol Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46225 U.S.A. This is the largest annual trade show of its kind, the WWETT Show attracts some 14,000 environmental service professionals and exhibitor personnel from 53 countries. Register now and...

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Kansas City’s Conversion to Automated Water Systems

Nov 02

Kansas City’s Conversion to Automated Water Systems

The Kansas City Water Supply Treatment Plant is operated by Kansas City’s Water Services, which also handles water distribution, wastewater collection and treatment, and storm water management for 600,000 customers, in addition to serving 33 wholesale customers in the region. The city’s first water plant opened in 1875. A new facility built in 1928 increased capacity from 5.0 to 110 mgd, and a 1950s upgrade raised that to 207 mgd. Today, the plant is permitted for 240 mgd and delivers an average of 104 mgd. Raw water from the Missouri River and a wellfield is pumped to six primary basins for settling and chemical addition (polymer and return lime sludge from the secondary basins). After chlorine, lime, potassium permanganate and ammonia addition, the water goes to six secondary settling basins. It is treated with carbon dioxide and, if needed, with carbon to improve taste and odor before moving to six final settling basins. From there, the water enters the plant’s 36 filters and is treated with fluoride and phosphate. The utility is adding a new water tower in the northeast section of the city and rehabilitating a major pumping station with seven 30 mgd (million gallons/day) pumps and another station with four 25 mgd pumps. The plant’s greatest challenge is keeping the equipment in good repair and replacing older equipment with new technology.  That said, Kansas City, Perma-Liner Industries can help! We’ve got just the right thing to get you all set for the winter months, too!  If your crew isn’t installing and curing lines in less than an hour, we’re here to offer you our cutting edge steam cure technology.   For year-round productivity using 100% solids epoxy, get the Stinger Steam Cure System = problem solved! To find out how, go to www.perma-liner.com or call us @...

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