Kansas City Assists Homeowner’s with Sewer Repair Costs

Feb 28

Kansas City Assists Homeowner’s with Sewer Repair Costs

Kansas City has implemented a new, and much needed, program to improve the quality of unstable sewer systems throughout residential areas. For a limited time, residents facing street repair for sewer work are able to receive as much as $5,000 for charges associated with the repair. Ongoing improvements are taking place due to a number of households with improper plumbing connections and drainage problems. If a resident chooses to participate in the optional program, the primary focus will be on disconnecting gutter downspouts, sump pumps and other drainage mechanisms on private property; that are improperly connected to sewers.  Because of these faulty connections, heavy rains have overwhelmed the city’s sewer system and contributed to several incidences of sewer backups in homes and businesses. The reimbursement program is designated only for single-family homeowners facing repair on a paved public street, incurring a fee. Sewer and water line repair have been on the radar of many cities within past few years. Many cities have promoted insurance programs that cover broken lines for a monthly fee.  While leaks in the sewer pipelines, faulty meters, and unmetered water remain part of the problem, the city has also lost significant water by way of abandoned houses and rental properties, where water meters have been removed. The city has recently replaced approximately 100 miles of water mains. Interestingly, the oldest pipelines, valves, and meters are located south of the Missouri River. As the city expanded south of the river, it inherited older water systems.  Kansas City has nearly 2,800 miles of pipes, 35,000 valves, 23,000 fire hydrants and 18 pumping stations which are dispersed across more than 300 square miles. Interesting fact: nationwide the average water treatment facility pumps 25,000 to 30,000 gallons of nonrevenue water per connection per year. That averages approximately $30 to $40 per...

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Kansas City Redesigns Newer Sewer Systems and Infrastructures

Jul 08

Kansas City Redesigns Newer Sewer Systems and Infrastructures

A septic system can lead to potential problems when operating in place of a more modernized wastewater system. The city of Independence experienced a dilemma when using an older system without grease traps when renovating a building within the educational school district.  A recent project to upgrade the school’s five-building sewer system was successfully completed. Prior to the renovation, all the pipes ran by gravity through 150 feet of 6-inch Schedule 40 PVC pipes- to a pair of 2,000-gallon septic tanks connected in series by 6-inch pipe and spaced 10 feet apart. More sewer news: Kansas City also recently rehabilitated a 125-year-old original 114-in. circular brick combined sewer due to its age and decline. The sewer eventually sustained a crack in the crown of the structure, affecting the structural integrity of the pipe. To redesign the pipeline, PVC-based material that is spirally wound into an existing pipeline was utilized. With the use of newer technologies and cured-in-place pipeline, the result is a strong composite pipe integrated with the existing pipeline. The new sewer now has proven staying power and improved hydraulic flows. Interesting fact: Kansas City has impressive infrastructure including the Pedestrian Bridge that links the River Market to the downtown Kansas City Riverfront. Built over a decade ago, the bridge is 650 ft. long and provides a bicycle and pedestrian link between the north end of Main Street and the original birthplace of the city on the banks of the Missouri River. The bridge serves as a pivotal connection between the surrounding community and the many amenities along the river. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in Waterbury, Connecticut which will include live demonstrations and show specials! Click Here to Register! Or call 1-866-336-2568. See you...

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Kansas City’s Bright Idea for Manhole Covers

Jun 21

Kansas City’s Bright Idea for Manhole Covers

Kansas City has come up with a very creative and clever project for manhole covers. These newly designed covers are capturing the attention of many as they walk through the city. The project consists of 100 intricately designed covers, scattered strategically throughout the city. From inception, the idea was to foster a sense of environmental consciousness and accountability. The new design is meant to remind the community to refrain from putting trash down the storm drains as many of them lead to rivers, streams and creeks. This month, Kansas City Water Services installed the final two new storm drain covers in a neighborhood at 74th and Lydia. The new design is a result of a contest held two years ago. More than 50 people, of varying ages, submitted entries and two winners worked together on the final design. The new manhole covers are as cost effective as the older ones with minimal expense as there are 50,000 storm drains in the city. The new manhole covers have been put in high traffic areas such as the Power and Light District, and Kauffman Stadium. This will incite a likelihood of visibility, as well as awareness. Water Services are saving the old storm drain covers and will use them as replacements when one gets damaged or destroyed. Interesting fact: Did you know the 909 Walnut building is on the National Registry of Historic Buildings and is a treasured sight on Kansas City’s skyline? Originally built in 1931, the renovation of the 35-story building has turned this historic and unique piece of architecture into a modernized luxury with residences and office space creating a vibrant downtown area. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay...

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Kansas City’s Infrastructure Highlights and Delights

Dec 18

Kansas City’s Infrastructure Highlights and Delights

Kansas City’s green infrastructure program is currently focusing on a Middle Blue River Basin, which encompasses 744 acres and was divided into five project areas. Recently, the city completed installation of a pilot project, which is located in an older, mixed-use residential and commercial neighborhood served by combined sewers. Before installing the intended green infrastructure, the city conducted a complete rehab of the sewer system in the pilot neighborhood, cleaning and repairing for maintenance purposes. A nearby neighborhood was left untouched, with no sewer rehab or green infrastructure, to serve as a control area. Kansas City Water Services constructed more than 150 green solutions, such as the curb extension rain garden and a porous sidewalk, as part of the 100-acre pilot project in the Middle Blue River Basin. Interesting Fact: Several of Kansas City’s Parks have fountains that are available to “dye” in celebration and recognition of an event or cause. One of these Parks is the Northland Fountain. It has also been called the “Spirit of Cooperation”, because it illustrates the unified effort of the public and private sectors worked together to achieve a common goal. Its benefactors range from Farmland’s $30,000 contribution to a three-cent donation from a schoolchild. An 80′ circular base contains a center geyser which can propel water to a height of 35′. In winter it becomes an ice sculpture attracting people to view varied shapes created by the frozen water. The Northland Fountain is one of three Kansas City’s Parks fountains that remains on year-round. Kansas City is known for miles of scenic boulevards and parkways throughout the city, where 48 fountains and 117 memorials and sculptures add to the attraction of the city. Kansas City, if you’re looking for the best plumber in your area or have questions about the trenchless CIPP industry, Perma-liner Industries can help you!  For more information call us or go online to www.perma-liner.com/...

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Kansas City’s Conversion to Automated Water Systems

Nov 02

Kansas City’s Conversion to Automated Water Systems

The Kansas City Water Supply Treatment Plant is operated by Kansas City’s Water Services, which also handles water distribution, wastewater collection and treatment, and storm water management for 600,000 customers, in addition to serving 33 wholesale customers in the region. The city’s first water plant opened in 1875. A new facility built in 1928 increased capacity from 5.0 to 110 mgd, and a 1950s upgrade raised that to 207 mgd. Today, the plant is permitted for 240 mgd and delivers an average of 104 mgd. Raw water from the Missouri River and a wellfield is pumped to six primary basins for settling and chemical addition (polymer and return lime sludge from the secondary basins). After chlorine, lime, potassium permanganate and ammonia addition, the water goes to six secondary settling basins. It is treated with carbon dioxide and, if needed, with carbon to improve taste and odor before moving to six final settling basins. From there, the water enters the plant’s 36 filters and is treated with fluoride and phosphate. The utility is adding a new water tower in the northeast section of the city and rehabilitating a major pumping station with seven 30 mgd (million gallons/day) pumps and another station with four 25 mgd pumps. The plant’s greatest challenge is keeping the equipment in good repair and replacing older equipment with new technology.  That said, Kansas City, Perma-Liner Industries can help! We’ve got just the right thing to get you all set for the winter months, too!  If your crew isn’t installing and curing lines in less than an hour, we’re here to offer you our cutting edge steam cure technology.   For year-round productivity using 100% solids epoxy, get the Stinger Steam Cure System = problem solved! To find out how, go to www.perma-liner.com or call us @...

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Kansas City’s Home Repair Program for Sewer

Sep 25

Kansas City’s Home Repair Program for Sewer

Kansas City’s Neighborhoods and Housing Services Department has a program that will benefit homeowners who live in Clay, Jackson and Platte Counties.  This program assists residents who need to make minor repairs to their property.  It is an income based program and follows the HUD 2015 guidelines.  The applications are being accepted this month starting in September and continuing through the end of October.  Homeowners may submit an application for household maintenance which includes, but is not limited to, Plumbing – main water lines, which may include branch lines and water heater Plumbing – sewer mains, which may include branch lines.  There are requirements to enroll in this program. Applicants must own and reside on the property to be repaired.  If home repair assistance was received in the last five years, you are not eligible to apply. Properties must also be single family residences.  Once the application is completed and meets all the criteria, it is sent to the Housing and Energy Conservation Services Section.  Eligible applicants will receive one service in accordance to the Community Development Block Grant which was established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program is a flexible program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of unique community development needs. Beginning in 1974, the CDBG program is one of the longest continuously run programs at HUD. The CDBG program provides annual grants on a formula basis to 1209 general units of local government and States. Looking for a highly recommended plumber?  Perma-Liner Industries has partnered with the best plumbers in your area to provide you with outstanding service.  We provide only the best referrals for licensed and certified professionals.  Call us or go online to see how we can help.  1-866-336-2568 or...

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