America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

Jun 06

America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

There are many variables threatening America’s water from pollution issues and aging infrastructure to raising costs and droughts and rainfall patterns as the climate changes. The U.S. used to be a leader when it came to water infrastructure and management. Now, the U.S. is lagging behind receiving D ratings for dams, drinking water and wastewater. It’s time to start focuses on possible solutions to curb these issues – the U.S. can get A ratings and below are some of the solutions that may get the nation where it needs to be. It starts with creating a national-level governance. Water technically has no boundaries and is very good at sometimes ignoring the municipal boundaries it does have. So what does this mean? One town’s water use or sewage can affect other cities or states that rely on the same water supply. That’s why many countries have a national water authority or commission that oversees water management across the country. The U.S. does not and we’re exactly the opposite. Our nation’s water supply is managed by individual municipalities each doing their own thing. This creates numerous hurdles to climb and makes it difficult to initiate and complete regional projects. To do almost anything, there needs to be a budget and that’s the case with water infrastructure. The government spends only two percent of its GDP on infrastructure, and water infrastructure makes up just a part of that. The U.S. is spending less than Vietnam, Mexico, and Chile. If the U.S. wants nice things, like a water infrastructure that does not fail us, then the U.S. has to be willing to pay for them. One possible solution that most do not consider is the private investor sector. Many investors are interested in investing in water-related issues, but they want to know more about the social and environmental effects their investments will have. The problem is that there are a lot of inconsistencies in how companies report these estimates. It has been suggested that investors, academics and regulators need to team up to create a standardized system of evaluating the impacts of sustainable investments. Another challenge is getting investors to understand how complex and important water is, since it affects agriculture and many...

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Is Waiting Worth the Risk?

May 08

Is Waiting Worth the Risk?

When it comes to municipalities, they try to do what’s in the best interest of its residents while also making sure it’s in the best interest of the city and lessening risk. It can range from tax breaks and school rezoning to real estate development and infrastructure repairs. Planning ahead on for these items as best as possible can save a lot of time and money, which is the case in Kansas City with its aging water mains. City officials have devised a plan to be proactive instead of reactive when it comes to handling the aging water main systems throughout the city. In 2012, the city suffered more than 1,800 water main breaks with an average of five per day. A good number of these have to do with the Kansas City clay soil. Clay soil swells and shrinks during extreme weather and record-breaking heat that year in Kansas City is believed to have been a contributing factor to the record number of breaks. The city had to do something to lower the number of breaks. Because of this significantly high number of breaks, a local water service company rolled out a water main replacement program. Within five years of rolling out the replacement program, there had been a huge reduction in breaks. The company developed a forecasting method that included their entire 2,800 miles of in-ground pipe, essentially a model that helps them define where all the pipes are, which ones were at the greatest risk, and where they can save the most dollars by replacing the riskiest sections before anything happens. They have made a commitment to replace one percent of the lines annually. As a result of their efforts, the number of annual breaks has gone from over 1,800 down to 745 last year. According to the city’s statistics, more than $108 million has been spent to date on the water main replacement program. The numbers also show a savings of more than $22 million in potential repairs as the work has enhanced the integrity of the system and the instances of water main breaks have gone down. If you are looking for information on protecting, lining and repairing pipes, or for the nearest installer,...

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Kansas City takes the City by Storm (And Storm Drain)

Jun 26

Kansas City takes the City by Storm (And Storm Drain)

Kansas City has been busy revamping the sewer mains and pipelines in order to thwart the problematic sewer overflows. Before this, a comprehensive water main replacement program was launched which included a detailed plan. Mainly, to keep the 2,800-mile water main matrix working up to better standards. In years’ past, the city had experienced over 1800 water main breaks. Currently, the program is anticipating the replacement of the sewer pipelines in a process time of up to 30 miles a year. Due to drought concerns, the city is also keeping water-saving tactics at the forefront of this initiative. In conjunction with addressing water main stability, the additional sewer rehabilitation project is well underway. Did you know that the city uses dye, or essentially food coloring, to test the efficiency of the sewer system? This is done on a daily basis to prevent sewer overflows and basement backups. Interestingly, red dye is used to confirm the location of a service line to a property. Green is used for cave-ins and sinkholes and also in storm drains, which may lead to a common sighting of green dye in the local stream or creek. Sewer advisory just in…the city has alerted residents in the area near 200 W. 94th Street of a sewer overflow.  At the time of the incident, the overflow was ongoing and spilling less than one-half gallon per minute. The manhole and sewer are located on the bank of Dyke Branch Creek.  Wastewater has entered the creek but has been contained by repair and bypass pumping. Kansas City, Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our exciting summer event! If you missed our Open House this month in California, no worries! Come to our Delaware Open House next month! Stay tuned for all of the details. It’s taking place from July18th-20th. We want to see you there, and as always, we’ll have our experienced crew demonstrating equipment and all the latest in CIPP. Make a plan to attend and see you...

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Full Steam Ahead! Check Out Perma-Liner Industries 2016 Events Line Up!!

Aug 18

Full Steam Ahead! Check Out Perma-Liner Industries 2016 Events Line Up!!

Undoubtedly, you are still enjoying the many highlights that this time of year brings, but as the glory days of summer begin to wane, no worries! We’ve got some exciting events scheduled for you and they’re coming up right around the corner. Mark your calendars for these informative trade shows that you won’t want to miss! First up, Perma-Liner Industries is pleased to announce we’ll be in Milwaukee on September 12-13th for the WEQ Fair. This is the place to be to gain a world of knowledge about the trenchless pipelining Industry and the equipment Perma-Liner Industries manufactures. You can expect to see our live demonstrations in the comfortable outdoor setting of the Wisconsin State Fair Park. This Wastewater Equipment Fair will have an assortment of commercial, industrial and municipal gear to become familiarized with and you’ll be intrigued to learn about the many systems used for sewer cleaning and rehabilitations. Interesting fact: did you know the Milwaukee Mile is a one-mile long oval race track located at Wisconsin State Fair Park? It’s the oldest operating motor speedway in the world. Next up! WEFTEC. Folks, this is the super bowl of trade shows. Not to be missed, and acclaimed as the largest annual water quality exhibition in the world. Also known for the most comprehensive show floor, this conference provides an unparalleled bird’s- eye view to the most cutting-edge technologies in the field. This is an event that will give you the chance to network with associates in the industry or just learn much more about the field of technology and water quality, treatments, equipment, and services. We’ll have our representatives there to answer questions, perform live demonstrations and provide resources to further your knowledge of the trenchless pipelining industry. Here’s the info to mark your calendars: The 89th Technical Exhibition and Conference is being held on Sept. 24- 28th at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center. Interesting fact: The Convention Center has 1.1 million square feet of contiguous exhibit space and is the sixth largest convention facility in the nation. Stay tuned… we’ll have more information (on even more events) on deck, coming up soon! Looking forward to see you...

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Kansas City Redesigns Newer Sewer Systems and Infrastructures

Jul 08

Kansas City Redesigns Newer Sewer Systems and Infrastructures

A septic system can lead to potential problems when operating in place of a more modernized wastewater system. The city of Independence experienced a dilemma when using an older system without grease traps when renovating a building within the educational school district.  A recent project to upgrade the school’s five-building sewer system was successfully completed. Prior to the renovation, all the pipes ran by gravity through 150 feet of 6-inch Schedule 40 PVC pipes- to a pair of 2,000-gallon septic tanks connected in series by 6-inch pipe and spaced 10 feet apart. More sewer news: Kansas City also recently rehabilitated a 125-year-old original 114-in. circular brick combined sewer due to its age and decline. The sewer eventually sustained a crack in the crown of the structure, affecting the structural integrity of the pipe. To redesign the pipeline, PVC-based material that is spirally wound into an existing pipeline was utilized. With the use of newer technologies and cured-in-place pipeline, the result is a strong composite pipe integrated with the existing pipeline. The new sewer now has proven staying power and improved hydraulic flows. Interesting fact: Kansas City has impressive infrastructure including the Pedestrian Bridge that links the River Market to the downtown Kansas City Riverfront. Built over a decade ago, the bridge is 650 ft. long and provides a bicycle and pedestrian link between the north end of Main Street and the original birthplace of the city on the banks of the Missouri River. The bridge serves as a pivotal connection between the surrounding community and the many amenities along the river. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in Waterbury, Connecticut which will include live demonstrations and show specials! Click Here to Register! Or call 1-866-336-2568. See you...

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Kansas City Goes Above and Beyond For Water Quality

May 16

Kansas City Goes Above and Beyond For Water Quality

Kansas City has begun the largest green infrastructure project to date for the city. The substantial 10-acre, $30 Million investment is located at 81st and Troost. This is an all-encompassing community initiative to keep stormwater out of the combined sewer system, as well as, provide a cleaner environment for Kansas City neighborhoods. The 10-acre site will likely be scheduled for additional investments such as a space for public meetings and a community garden. The 81st and Troost project is one of three areas receiving infrastructure improvements. Construction is also underway at Arletta Park and will soon begin at Rachel Morado. These projects are part of Kansas City’s Overflow Control Program- a 25-year, federally mandated effort to reduce sewer overflows and improve water quality. Work on all three areas is anticipated to be complete by December 2017. Another imaginative project in which the city sought the help of community artists, was the creation of 100 artistically designed storm drain manhole covers. The attention-getting new design is intended for residents to understand that the trash and car fluids that end up on the ground, the fertilizer that washes off of our lawns, goes down into the rivers, creeks and streams. It reminds all who pass by to be mindful about what goes into the storm drains. Recently, the city launched a design contest for local artists to create a water quality message that would ring true with the public. The winning design features a turtle, fish, and frog-along with an embossed message “Think: Protect Your Water, Protect Our Home”. The manhole cover design fosters water quality awareness and serves as an impetus for the safekeeping of the environment. The new covers will be placed strategically throughout Kansas City. Certified Installers take note: Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our Refresher Training (Perma-Lateral™ specific) that will take place on July 12th and 13th at our Clearwater facility!! Please plan on attending. Register by calling 1-866-336-2568 or Click Here! See you...

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