Kansas City Assists Homeowner’s with Sewer Repair Costs

Feb 28

Kansas City Assists Homeowner’s with Sewer Repair Costs

Kansas City has implemented a new, and much needed, program to improve the quality of unstable sewer systems throughout residential areas. For a limited time, residents facing street repair for sewer work are able to receive as much as $5,000 for charges associated with the repair. Ongoing improvements are taking place due to a number of households with improper plumbing connections and drainage problems. If a resident chooses to participate in the optional program, the primary focus will be on disconnecting gutter downspouts, sump pumps and other drainage mechanisms on private property; that are improperly connected to sewers.  Because of these faulty connections, heavy rains have overwhelmed the city’s sewer system and contributed to several incidences of sewer backups in homes and businesses. The reimbursement program is designated only for single-family homeowners facing repair on a paved public street, incurring a fee. Sewer and water line repair have been on the radar of many cities within past few years. Many cities have promoted insurance programs that cover broken lines for a monthly fee.  While leaks in the sewer pipelines, faulty meters, and unmetered water remain part of the problem, the city has also lost significant water by way of abandoned houses and rental properties, where water meters have been removed. The city has recently replaced approximately 100 miles of water mains. Interestingly, the oldest pipelines, valves, and meters are located south of the Missouri River. As the city expanded south of the river, it inherited older water systems.  Kansas City has nearly 2,800 miles of pipes, 35,000 valves, 23,000 fire hydrants and 18 pumping stations which are dispersed across more than 300 square miles. Interesting fact: nationwide the average water treatment facility pumps 25,000 to 30,000 gallons of nonrevenue water per connection per year. That averages approximately $30 to $40 per...

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Kansas City Redesigns Newer Sewer Systems and Infrastructures

Jul 08

Kansas City Redesigns Newer Sewer Systems and Infrastructures

A septic system can lead to potential problems when operating in place of a more modernized wastewater system. The city of Independence experienced a dilemma when using an older system without grease traps when renovating a building within the educational school district.  A recent project to upgrade the school’s five-building sewer system was successfully completed. Prior to the renovation, all the pipes ran by gravity through 150 feet of 6-inch Schedule 40 PVC pipes- to a pair of 2,000-gallon septic tanks connected in series by 6-inch pipe and spaced 10 feet apart. More sewer news: Kansas City also recently rehabilitated a 125-year-old original 114-in. circular brick combined sewer due to its age and decline. The sewer eventually sustained a crack in the crown of the structure, affecting the structural integrity of the pipe. To redesign the pipeline, PVC-based material that is spirally wound into an existing pipeline was utilized. With the use of newer technologies and cured-in-place pipeline, the result is a strong composite pipe integrated with the existing pipeline. The new sewer now has proven staying power and improved hydraulic flows. Interesting fact: Kansas City has impressive infrastructure including the Pedestrian Bridge that links the River Market to the downtown Kansas City Riverfront. Built over a decade ago, the bridge is 650 ft. long and provides a bicycle and pedestrian link between the north end of Main Street and the original birthplace of the city on the banks of the Missouri River. The bridge serves as a pivotal connection between the surrounding community and the many amenities along the river. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in Waterbury, Connecticut which will include live demonstrations and show specials! Click Here to Register! Or call 1-866-336-2568. See you...

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